SEPTEMBER 2021  |  ISSUE 18

PARTNERSHIPS


We teamed up with Adidas to create a fresh take on the 1951 Stars uniforms. These flexfit hats are a new addition to the jerseys that were featured in our recent limited edition Topps cards.

Purchase your Adidas jersey and hat today!
 

New merch out to celebrate our partnership with Empowerment Pursuit. We commend the work that our Baseball Advisors Ro Coleman and Jarrod Parker are doing with the next generation of players.

Purchase your Empowerment Pursuit hat today!

Breaking barriers is something we are familiar with at the Nashville Stars. Our Star of the Month, Amanda Martinez, is doing just that at Middle Tennessee State University this semester. During her teaching fellowship in the Department of Recording History, she will focus specifically on the history of country music. 

“As a society, we have short term historical memory,” said Martinez. “Teaching through the lens of cultural history is a way to get people's attention. We can touch on the larger themes of history through studying culture.” 

With over ten years of traveling to Nashville for school and work, she is now planting roots in Music City. Starting as an intern at the Country Music Hall of Fame, Martinez realized that her passion grew by telling stories through the archives. Now 10 years later, she is telling those stories to students while analyzing topics such as race and gender relations, material culture, generational conflict, and the role of “authenticity” in the history and culture of American country music. 

Martinez also notices the great strides the community has made in recent years to celebrate its culture. “The National Museum of African American Music, the first Black owned business opening on Broadway (Slim & Husky’s), 5th Avenue changing to Rep. John Lewis Way, the work the Nashville Stars are doing… There is a rich black history in Nashville to celebrate.” 

Martinez is from the San Francisco Bay Area and a lifetime Giants fan. One of her favorite things about the game is the sense of family in the baseball community. “With all the uncertainty in the world, it’s comforting to turn on MLB TV to the familiar voices of Jon Miller and Kruk & Kuip,” said Martinez. With the historic background of the “Nashville Stars” name, she commends our commitment to honoring the Negro League teams of the past.  “For us to know our history, we can better tackle the problems of today,” said Martinez. “By analyzing the past, we can become a better, more equal society moving forward.”

Hispanic Heritage Month is an important celebration not just for the Nashville Stars, but for the entire country. It celebrates and recognizes the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America.

The observation started in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson.  President Ronald Reagan expanded it to cover a 30-day period starting in 1988.

Alberto Gonzales is the Chair of the Music City Baseball Board. After working as White House counsel starting in 2001, he became the nation’s first Hispanic U.S. Attorney General under President George W. Bush from 2005-2007.

“Hispanic Heritage Month has a special meaning for me,” said Gonzales. “When I worked at the White House and the Department of Justice, President Bush always had a Hispanic Heritage Month celebration and I was often asked to speak at that. It was one of the most joyful events that I participated in when I was in Washington.”

While Music City Baseball works to secure a Major League Baseball franchise, the organization understands and appreciates the significance of Hispanic heritage. A report by the Institute for Diversity and Ethics showed that approximately 28 percent of MLB players are Hispanic or Latinx.

“I think it’s important for Music City Baseball to pay attention to recognitions like Hispanic Heritage Month for a variety of reasons,” said Gonzales. “I think that a large segment of baseball is Hispanic and I think they would appreciate the fact that we recognize the importance of Hispanic heritage quite honestly. I also think that it’s the right thing to do as a country. We are a great country because of our diversity. It’s part of our strength.”

Major League Baseball has yearly celebrations acknowledging Hispanic Heritage Month, which includes special programming and recognition of former and current Hispanic players.

“I appreciate the efforts of MLB to reach out to diverse communities,” said Gonzales. “Obviously, they appreciate the fact that the game’s greatest players have been Hispanic. There’s a great deal of interest in baseball in Mexico and in Latin America and South America.”

Hispanic Heritage Month runs from September 15 to October 15.

IN THE COMMUNITY

Over 130K fans made their way to the three day Big Machine Music City Grand Prix. We were able to talk to locals and traveling fans at our sponsor booth. Hearing from you, your stories, and passion for bringing MLB to middle Tennessee keeps our momentum going!
Lauren and Jarrod Parker
Vince Neil
Ken Abraham, Monica Loar and Alberto Gonzalez
Monica Loar and the Music City Grand Prix Mascot

THE STARS TAKE THE FIELD OF DREAMS

Fox Sports reporter and Flippin’ Bats podcaster, Ben Verlander, rocked his Adidas Stars Jersey to report on the iconic Field of Dreams game. Check out the coverage here!

HAT GIVEAWAY

We're giving away two Nashville Stars Adidas hats! Click the links below to enter! 
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